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DAMA

Originally published January 14, 2010

Bill Inmon shares his concerns about the future of data administration.

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Comments

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Posted January 15, 2010 by Ryan Prociuk rprociuk@gmail.com

Aside from agreeing with Neil; on the persumption of nationality; and the fact that technology is global; I think it may also be due to the fact the DA role has become a commodity.

As a once Data Administrator in my early years; the role has greatly dimished in tasks and has generally become a commodity based upon certification on a partlicular platform. The governance, integration, and modeling activities have been assigned to other roles and in some cases have been moved away from IT, Along with this many of these people don't see value; me being one of them; in what DAMA offers; I find it to be stuck in the '90s in terms of thought leardership. What has happened is a push towards taking part in grassroot or local events where one can meet with peers and share technology progression.

 

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Posted January 15, 2010 by Seth Grimes grimes@altaplana.com

Bill, in my view, DAMA as an organization is passé.  Perhaps this view is shared by other, younger Americans who don't have years invested in DAMA and who don't, unlike foreigners, see travel to a U.S. DAMA conference as attractive for whatever reason.  I haven't been to a TDWI national conference since August 2008 (when you and I sat for an hour to discuss text analytics and text ETL), but my perception is that the TDWI demographic is different from the demographic you perceive at DAMA.

Oh, and I agree with Neil regarding judgments about foreign appearing individuals.

Seth

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Posted January 14, 2010 by Neil Raden nraden@hiredbrains.com

Bill,

 

Just because someone isn't white like you doesn't mean they aren't "American." In case you haven't noticed, this is a pluralistic society, even more so in technology. Did you check their passports? 

Amazing bit of xenophobia here.

 

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Posted January 14, 2010 by Andrew Powell

So very true Bill. Its sad to see the lack of young americans interested in advanced technology fields. The education in the US compared with other regions is lacking in so many degrees. The problem is to blame on children not being pushed, driven and engaged during their academic careers. We can only hope things get better, but school budgets seem to be the first to get pinched nationwide every year. 

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Posted January 14, 2010 by Charles Harbour

Official Greybeard title bestowed!  You'll need to work on being grumpier, though.  :-)

 

I've been an honorary Greybeard for a while (have the grumpy part down at least), wondering if the consolidation/outsourcing of data centers is going to make these kind of jobs more or less obsolete.  Just yesterday, Craig Mullins was discussing how the importance of sifting through the data/deciding what to measure from the data is becoming more important as the volume of data overwhelms folks.  Reading between the lines, it's not so much how the data is stored or the foresight used in managing it, but rather what you can do to best glean information from it.  And if you have a Netezza machine, where you can hold all of your data in memory, you don't need to worry about silly things like tuning or architecture...  *sigh*

 

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Posted January 14, 2010 by Gary Murphy

I am not sure the continuity will be lost.  We will have us 50-something Americans mentoring those younger people overseas or while they are here on Visas.  Some of those foreign-born will chose to stay here in America as well.

Whether moving those jobs to non-Americans is a problem or not is a different discussion, but the needs of American and non-American industry will be served by the current direction.  Perhaps younger Americans will get involved in the "sexier" aspects of data, such as semantic technology integration, and the day-to-day aspects will continue to be outsourced.

Not all is lost, but it's not what I would chose for America. (I am seeing the same trends in other fields of IT, too, not just data administration)

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