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Displaying 120–135 (of 2528)

Title Date
The Future of IPTV

Summary
CHR's Jerry Weber discusses IPTV game-changers and emerging trends for successful IPTV implementation
11-15-2011
GPS on the Run?

Summary
The Supreme Court earlier this month heard arguments on a relatively common drug case, but there is a chance for this case to set the groundwork, for good or ill, on resolving most of the issues I discussed recently regarding the murky state of privacy protections from the government in the United States.
11-15-2011
Infonetics: SBC market a $1B business by 2015; Acme Packet top vendor

Summary
Talk about dominating... new research from Infonetics shows that 96 percent of service providers asked to pick the top two global SBC vendors named Acme Packet (Nasdaq: APKT), and 26 percent of respondents named only the Bedford, Mass.-based company. Infonetics Research, in its recently released "SBC Deployment Strategies: Global Service Provider Survey," also said the SBC market, grew 45 percent in 2010 to $271 million, as IP voice traffic continued to grow. The segment should hit $1 billion by 2015, Infornetics said, driven by fixed-mobile convergence and wireless access. "Though traditionally deployed in fixed-line networks for residential and business VoIP service access (including trunking), the use of session border controllers for interconnection between service providers continues to expand as the world's voice networks increasingly go all-IP," said Diane Myers, directing analyst for VoIP and IMS at Infonetics Research. "Our latest survey confirms that two of the biggest growth areas for new SBC deployments over the next two years are fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) and wireless access." The research firm said SIP trunking is the No. 1 SBC application used by service providers and will continue to be through 2013, followed by interconnecting to other service providers and residential VoIP. For more: - see this release Related articles: Research: Interoperability issues still hold back SIP trunking adoption Metaswitch jumps into crowded SBC market; Mitel will stick with single-tier model SBC market heats up in Q2, attracts new vendors Acme Packet E-SBCs integrated in to HP's UC solutions Acme Packet expands SBC lead with new PLDT deal
11-14-2011
Sprint wants to increase wholesale customers by 10%

Summary
Sprint Nextel (NYSE:S) plans to increase the number of wholesale customers by 10 percent over the next year, a senior executive said. In an interview with Bloomberg, Matt Carter, president of Sprint Wholesale Solutions and New Ventures, said the company is accelerating its push into the wholesale business and is providing more services to its wholesale customers. Sprint currently has around more than 100 wholesale customers, representing 6.3 million subscribers. Sprint's total customer base is 53 million. The focus on wholesale, in addition to Sprint's emphasis on its prepaid brands such as Assurance Wireless, indicate that the carrier increases is looking beyond postpaid subscribers to grow its business.  Carter said Sprint is offering its wholesale customers services such as billing, marketing support and competitive analysis, rather than just selling them capacity. "We are kind of a factory that produces these capabilities," he said. Some of Sprint's most high-profile wholesale customers include Leap Wireless (NASDAQ:LEAP) and Best Buy, as well as smaller players such as Credo Mobile, Liberty Wireless and PlatinumTel. Wholesale has become an increasingly critical part of Sprint's business. Sprint added a net of 835,000 wholesale and affiliate subscribers in the third quarter, nearly double the 441,000 retail subscribers it added. That was a stark reversal from the third quarter last year when wholesale additions trailed Sprint's branded customers.Sprint said  in August it would start wholesaling Clearwire's (NASDAQ:CLWR) mobile WiMAX network to other companies, one of the results of a revised wholesale agreement the two companies inked in April. Carter said Sprint is marketing its wholesale capabilities to a variety of companies, including retailers and international carriers. Interestingly, Carter said customers of an unnamed Chinese carrier can get Sprint's handsets and service under the Chinese company's brand when they stay in the United States for prolonged periods of time. Donald Tan, president of China Telecom Americas, told Bloomberg in a recent interview that the telco will start selling wireless service in the United States under its own brand as an MVNO. Tan said that China Telecom, which uses the CDMA 2000 standard, is already in market trials with several potential wholesale partners, which he declined to name. For more:- see this Bloomberg articleRelated Articles:Sprint leans on low-income Assurance Wireless subs for growth China Telecom to launch U.S. MVNO in 2012 Sprint to wholesale Clearwire's WiMAX service to others
11-14-2011
AT&T reveals LTE Advanced plans

11-14-2011
How Catching More Fish Leads To Bigger Mobile-App Revenues

Summary
The main theme of the recent Open Mobile Summit in San Francisco was how to make money from the growing market for mobile applications. The big trend is a shift away from both premium content and advertising, and moving toward smaller incremental micropayments. Game operators are finding this shift makes it...
11-14-2011
MVNO Lycamobile unveils free calling incentive

Summary
Lycamobile, Europe's largest MVNO, is offering free and unlimited calls between its UK customers until Nov. 30. The company is offering the incentive to "accelerate" the growth of its UK MVNO operations. Commenting on the plan, Lycamobile CEO Milind Kangle said in a statement: "This unlimited free calls offer from Lycamobile to Lycamobile, demonstrates our continuous commitment to providing our customers with a high quality of service and fantastic value for money in this harsh economic climate." The company is said to have over 6.5 million customers across 14 countries including the UK, France, The Netherlands, Belgium and Switzerland. Lycamobile recently announced the launch this year of its third MVNO service in Poland, following launches in France and Germany, as part of the company's £132 million investment programme. Kangle said: "Our acceleration during 2011 has created significant distance between us and our nearest competitors which will only grow as we add further countries in 2011 and 2012." Separately, the French telecoms regulator Arcep released its quarterly update which highlighted the growing success of MVNOs. According to the agency 10.6 per cent of French mobile connections are now managed by MVNOs, compared to 6.9 per cent a year ago, and 5.6 per cent two years ago. Of particular note, MVNOs accounted for nearly 35 per cent of gross prepaid sales in the quarter, and for 18.7 per cent of all postpaid sales. For more:- see this Mobile News article- see this Mobile Europe article- see this Global Telecoms Business article Related Articles:China Telecom close to selecting European MVNO partnerOrange dumped as SFR scoops French MVNO dealFrench MVNOs want a more competitive marketRumour Mill: Google running MVNO test-bed in Spain
11-11-2011
Senate rejects effort to overturn net neutrality rules

Summary
The Senate on Thursday voted to block an effort to repeal the FCC's net neutrality rules for wireless and wired networks, the latest step in a series of legal and congressional maneuvers around the regulations. The vote, which fell along party lines, was 52-46 to reject a resolution to overturn the rules. The House passed a mainly symbolic measure in April to repeal the rules, which were published in the Federal Register in September after months of delay. Republicans want to repeal the rules, arguing that they are overly burdensome to telecommunications and wireless companies and that the FCC does not have the legal authority to enforce them. Democrats and the White House have defended the rules, and the Senate defeat of the resolution was cheered by public interest groups that have supported the regulations. Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.), chairman of the Commerce, Science and Technology committee, said that companies had helped shape the regulations. "These rules are the product of hard work, consensus and compromise," Rockefeller said in a statement. "So at the end of the day, the FCC's light-touch approach to network neutrality prevailed, and that is a good thing." Verizon Communications (NYSE:VZ) has sued to block the rules, arguing that they are unnecessary and that the FCC does not have the authority to make the rules. The rules were first passed by the FCC on a party-line 3-2 vote in December 2010 after months of contentious debate. Some supporters of net neutrality--particularly those at public interest groups--urged the FCC to enact stricter rules and reclassify broadband as a telecommunications service to give the FCC more authority over the topic, which the commission did not do. Under the FCC's rules, wireless carriers are barred from blocking services such as Google Voice and Skype that compete with their own voice and video offerings, as well as those in which they have an attributable interest. However, wireless carriers would not face the same restrictions wired operators will on blocking Web traffic and other applications--a ban on unreasonable discrimination in transmitting lawful network traffic. For more:- see this WSJ article (sub. req.)- see this Washington Post articleRelated Articles:FCC publishes net neutrality rules, likely sparking fresh lawsuits House votes to kill net neutrality rules Court tosses out Verizon, MetroPCS net neutrality suits on technicalityHouse Republicans challenge FCC's net neutrality rulesFCC tries to block Verizon, MetroPCS net neutrality challengesVerizon sues FCC over net neutrality rules
11-11-2011
Sprint leans on low-income Assurance Wireless subs for growth

Summary
Sprint Nextel (NYSE:S), which has made no secret about its desire to add postpaid subscribers and paid $15.5 billion over four years to sell Apple's (NASDAQ:AAPL) iPhone to get them, is also relying heavily on low-income prepaid customers for growth. According to a report in the Wall Street Journal, more than half of Sprint's net new customers in any given period have come from its Assurance Wireless brand, targeted at low-income subscribers. Assurance, which Sprint launched in 2010, provides a free phone and 250 voice minutes per month to qualifying customers, and is a part of a government subsidy program called Lifeline. Customers who qualify are often those who qualify for other federal benefit programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, or food stamps). Sprint does not disclose how many Assurance Wireless customers it has, but according to the Journal, the company now counts a little under 2 million total customers, and the brand is available in 30 states and the District of Columbia. Sprint had 53 million total subscribers at the end of the third quarter. Despite Sprint's reliance on Assurance customers, not all of the carrier's growth comes from the brand. In the third quarter, for example, Sprint added nearly 1.3 million net wireless customers, including net additions of 441,000 retail subscribers and net additions of 835,000 wholesale and affiliate subscribers as a result of growth in MVNOs reselling prepaid services. Sprint lost around 44,000 net postpaid subscribers during the quarter, narrower than the carrier's loss of 107,000 in the third quarter of 2010. Sprint is not the only carrier using Lifeline. Verizon Wireless (NYSE:VZ) and AT&T Mobility (NYSE:T)  also use the program to offer plans to low-income customers. América Móvil's U.S. TracFone unit is the largest Lifeline service provider via its SafeLink offering, which counts more than 2 million customers (TracFone had 19.3 million total subscribers at the end of the third quarter). SafeLink is available in 36 states and the District of Columbia. What makes Sprint's use of Assurance for growth so striking is the emphasis that it has put on its relationship with Clearwire (NASDAQ:CLWR) for a 4G network and devices as well as the lengths it has gone to get the iPhone. "Unfortunately, there's a large market of customers who are eligible based on their poverty level," John Carney, Sprint's senior vice president of consumer marketing, told the Journal. "This is not a customer, without subsidy, we would have gone after originally. We wouldn't have been able to make money." For more:- see this WSJ article (sub. req.)Related Articles:Sprint discontinues Common Cents Mobile prepaid brandTracFone expands SafeLink service to compete with Sprint offeringSprint unveils Common Cents Mobile, pay-per-minute prepaid brandSprint expands Common Cents Mobile at Wal-MartSprint launches multi-pronged prepaid wireless strategy
11-11-2011
Roll On, Digital Reorganization. Telefonica Posts First Loss In Nine Years

11-11-2011
SAP Partners With EMC, VMware on Cloud Platform

Summary
The company is deepening its partnerships with EMC and VMware to improve business agility and scale efficiencies. - As cloud computing and virtualization rapidly evolve, business management software specialist SAP (NYSE: SAP) is working in a three-way strategic collaboration with partners EMC (NYSE: EMC) and VMware to develop tools and services that make it possible for businesses to adopt cloud and run SAP s...
11-11-2011
Mobile Operators Missing Opportunity to Double Cash Returns for Investors

11-10-2011
Turning Customer Intelligence Into Gold

11-10-2011
How to declare 'one version of the truth'

Summary
Trying to establish "one version of the truth" when it comes to operational data can be like searching for the Holy Grail at a lot of companies. With a redoubled focus on managing via metrics these days, it is more important than ever to have one version to work with, writes Chris Murphy at InformationWeek. A CIO should just "declare" one version of the truth, suggests Jeanne Ross, director of MIT Sloan School's Center for Information Systems Research. Simply choose a source and then announce that it will be the version everyone will use. "Once you tell everyone 'This is our single source,' they work pretty hard to make it more accurate," Ross said at the TechTomorrow conference last month.  It may sound a bit impulsive, Murphy writes, but this approach can significantly cut the amount of time IT groups spend gathering and filtering information to deliver what they believe is the right data--even when there are constituencies who would just as soon leave some ambiguity in the numbers. This approach is somewhat reflective of a project at Procter & Gamble, where CIO Filippo Passerini and his group built a meeting room for executives to analyze business metrics. They did not wait for a perfect set of data to initiate the project, however. "We intentionally put the cart before the horse, because it is a way to force change," Passerini said. Trying to establish perfect data to serve as the "one source" does not necessarily match with any business goal. "It reeks of data for data's sake," Murphy warns. "But if people can see how a single source of the truth relates to gaining market share, or not ticking off customers, then they know why it's important. That's a truth they'll find worth seeking." For more:- see Chris Murphy's post at InformationWeek Related Articles:How to prepare for the 'big data' eraThe emerging world of non-traditional and synthetic dataAdvice: Stop worrying about data quality
11-09-2011
Hadoop gains traction in the enterprise

Summary
Enterprises have begun embracing open source storage and analysis system Hadoop even though technology issues and a host of questions related to data security and management remain. By enabling businesses to manage vast amounts of structured and unstructured data more affordably than relational database systems can, Hadoop is gaining traction beyond Web 2.0 companies like Google (NASDAQ: GOOG), Yahoo and eBay, reports Jaikumar Vijayan at ComputerWorld. JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM) has been using Hadoop for nearly three years in a growing number of functions, including fraud detection, IT risk management and self service, the company's managing director Larry Feinsmith said this week at the Hadoop World conference in New York. With Hadoop, Chase has been able to gather and store huge amounts of unstructured data from social media, blogs and transactions. Bringing all of the disparate data into one platform, the company can apply data mining and analytics tools on the information. The question right now for IT pros at Chase is whether Hadoop-based technology can one day be used for processing transactions as well.  There are a number of challenges enterprises should consider when implementing Hadoop, however, Feinsmith cautions. Products, standards and vendors seem to be in flux, making for a "very confusing marketplace," he said. There are also integration challenges and relatively few engineers with Hadoop expertise. What's more, the ability to aggregate such massive quantities of data, in itself, leads to a number of concerns around security, access, availability and business continuity. In a separate article, Vijayan takes a look at the security issues that are raised in deploying Hadoop. Data access concerns have led some federal agencies to keep sensitive data out of Hadoop databases. Other users have turned to encryption to protect data stored in a Hadoop environment. The jumble of disparate data that Hadoop can aggregate can mean mixing together information of varying security sensitivity, cautions Richard Clayton, a software engineer with Berico Technologies. Enterprises have to put the right controls in place to ensure role-based access.   Having so much data in one place also raises the risk of inadvertent disclosure and theft.  If analytical tools create new datasets with sensitive information, those sets have to be protected as well. One way that government agencies are protecting Hadoop-stored information is by walling it off in "enclaves" that only cleared personnel can access. Despite the technology's challenges, enterprises are vying for IT pros with Hadoop skills, reports Doug Henschen at InformationWeek. JPMorgan Chase, eBay and Cloudera were all in recruiting mode at the Hadoop World conference. Henschen notes that Hadoop World has tripled in size since the 2009 conference, and the technology has been embraced by IBM (NYSE: IBM), Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT)and Oracle (NASDAQ: ORCL) this year.  For more:- see Jaikumar Vijayan's article at ComputerWorld- see Jaikumar Vijayan's article on Hadoop security issues at ComputerWorld- see Doug Henschen's article at InformationWeek Related Articles:How Microsoft learned to accept open sourceConsider open source when deploying BI
11-09-2011

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