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Displaying 105–120 (of 2528)

Title Date
Apple's iPhone Eclipses Blackberry in Enterprise Survey

Summary
Apple's iPhone has surpassed Research In Motion's BlackBerry as the top smartphone platform among enterprise employees, according to a new global mobile workforce report from iPass. Apple's iPhone held a leading 45 percent market share in a survey of mobile workers at over 1,100 enterprises worldwide conducted from late September to late October. Today's mobile employees are critical to the success of every enterprise, which explains why 95 percent of mobile employees currently have smartphones -- up from 85 percent in 2010. What's more, the "median age of the mobile worker is about 41 now -- and that is down from 45, which we saw last time in this study," said iPass Vice President Kevin Murray. Smartphones are now in the hands of nearly every knowledge worker, and with users contributing 240 more work-hours per year on average than their non-mobile counterparts, noted iPass CEO Evan Kaplan. "Connectivity is essential," Kaplan said. "Work is no longer where you go but what you do." Freedom of Choice Among enterprise-class smartphone users, the iPhone's market share is 10 percentage points above what RIM's models collectively held last year -- when the BlackBerry smartphone platform led the enterprise smartphone field. One reason why Apple's iPhone now leads the pack is that 62 percent of enterprises now offer their employees the ability to choose the handheld device they would like to use. According to iPass, 44 percent are allowed to choose a device from a list of corporate-approved smartphones. Moreover, an additional 19 percent are permitted to use whatever mobile device they wish for accessing corporate resources. "No surprise, the iPhone is the number one smartphone out there as far as our sample is concerned," Murray said. Still, RIM's BlackBerry market share has only declined slightly from 35 percent in 2010 to 32 percent today, the report's authors...
11-17-2011
Study: European users trump U.S. on Android app downloads

Summary
Although the U.S. market leads the globe in total application downloads to devices running Google's (NASDAQ:GOOG) Android mobile operating system, Western European consumers far exceed their American counterparts on a downloads-per-user basis according to new data issued by Research2Guidance. Click here to view a larger version of this chart. Android device users in Sweden download more than 5.0 applications per month, more than any other nation, Research2Guidance reports--by comparison, Android owners in the U.S. install fewer than 2.5 apps every 30 days. Eight other international markets also lead the U.S. in monthly Android app downloads, including the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, South Korea, Portugal, the U.K. and Italy. In terms of overall Android Market app download volumes, the U.S. accounts for more than 50 percent, corresponding to close to 3.5 billion installs to date. South Korea is a distant second with 9 percent, trailed by the U.K., Germany and France. Research2Guidance adds that the average user in major Android markets installs two or three apps each month; consumers in Russia, Japan and China rank among the most passive app downloaders. Android powers 52.5 percent of all smartphones sold worldwide during the third quarter of 2011, more than doubling its global market share over a year ago, according to data issued earlier this week by research firm Gartner. Sales of Android smartphones topped 60 million, more than tripling sales of Symbian-based products at 19.5 million (translating to a market share of 16.9 percent, down from 36.3 percent a year ago). Apple's (NASDAQ:AAPL) iPhone follows with sales of 17.3 million, up from 13.5 million a year ago; its global market share nevertheless dipped to 15.0 percent from 16.6 percent in the third quarter of 2010. For more:- read this Research2Guidance blog entry Related articles:Gartner: Android fuels 52 percent of smartphone sales in Q3ComScore: Android closing in on 45% U.S. smartphone market shareGoogle's Schmidt: Microsoft is 'scared' of Android's successGoogle to acquire Motorola Mobility, vows Android will remain openComScore: Android closing in on 45 percent smartphone market share        
11-17-2011
When Will Cable's Advanced Ad Plan Pop?

Summary
Cable's pursuit of advanced advertising success has met some choppy waters, but a Canoe exec sees smoother and more lucrative sailing ahead
11-17-2011
AlcaLu Unveils Its Carrier Cloud Play

Summary
Alcatel-Lucent has developed what it believes is the first cloud services delivery system tailored to telcos' needs
11-17-2011
Three Cries Foul To EU Regulators Over British Mobile Commerce JV

11-17-2011
Russian airport to start Skype check-ins for flights

Summary
Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport is allowing passengers to check-in for their flights using Skype. The program, which the airport says is the first of its kind in the world, works along similar lines to Internet check-ins. Passengers call the airport using its Skype user name and are asked for their last name, flight information and to show their passport. Once the formalities are out of the way, passengers can print out a boarding pass. The airport expects 15 to 20 percent of passengers to use the service, which serves some 20 airlines flying into the airport. "The main problem [for traditional Internet check-in] is lack of communication with a real person, as a passenger is afraid to do something wrong," said an aiport officials. "Here you will have straight communications, so there will be no fear during registration." The airport said Skype will be available for check-in at Transaero, Air Astana, Royal Air Maroc, China Eastern Airlines, Estonian Air, Hainan Airlines, Hong Kong Airlines, Iran Air, Jat Airways, Turkish Airlines and other carriers. European regulators recently approved Microsoft's (Nasdaq: MSFT) acquisition of the popular free VoIP provider. For more: - see this WSJ article Related articles: Personal trainers offering 'virtual workouts' over Skype Skype user directory data used to ID BitTorrent file sharers Microsoft dials up Tango, not Skype for video calling on Mango
11-17-2011
France Telecom Offers Free Facebook to Emerging-Market Customers

Summary
France Telecom SA, the owner of the Orange mobile brand, will sell mobile phones with unlimited access to Facebook Inc. in eastern Europe and Africa, as it seeks to drive Internet services in faster-growing markets.
11-17-2011
Article: Case Study: AT&T Empowers Employees for B2B Social Engagement

Summary
Social media team focuses on proactive marketing and relationship-building
11-17-2011
From Barry Devlin: The Seven Faces of Data - Rethinking data's basic characteristics

Summary
In this paper, Barry Devlin reminds us of our dependency on trustworthy, consistent, timely and correct data. Proposing 7 fundamental traits of data structure, composition and use, he explains how IT professionals can respond to new business demands and novel technological advances.
11-17-2011
So you know your organization needs mobile--now what?

Summary
Guest post by Chad Udell Mobile is a hot topic nowadays when it comes to marketing, but businesses have just begun to realize the possibilities for implementing a mobile strategy for internal company usage. Many enterprise-level companies realize that there's value in using mobile for employee training as a standard tool for sales force usage, or a means to educate employees on new products before they go to market, or even how to provide checklists and other performance support applications and services, all of which can be referred to as "mobile learning." Getting one or two projects done as a pilot may not be difficult, but the key is getting businesses to sign off on mobile learning, and it's not a simple process. Defining, designing and implementing a mobile learning system within a large company is complex, costly and political. Yet, just like with any other new technology, it's the job of the CIO (or IT manager) to develop a compelling requirements analysis to make the business case for why the complexity and cost are worth it. A requirements analysis might not be a new concept in the IT department, but developing one with regard to mobile is most likely uncharted territory. So what's the best approach? Who are the stakeholders? Whenever a new technology is introduced to a company, there are usually multiple stakeholders who want to be--and should be--consulted during the process of gathering business requirements. These stakeholders typically include those who will use the system and those who have an interest in the technology succeeding within the organization. Stakeholders for mobile learning can include the following: Employees (Learners): all people receiving training in the organization Managers: managing directors, directors, sales managers, C-level executives Administrators: office administrators, HR staff, IT staff Partners: partners, vendors, suppliers Customers: clients and buyers of your products and services Always remember your stakeholders are critical in ensuring the adoption of mobile learning and can make decisions as representatives of larger groups and help communicate them. What are the stakeholders' business requirements? Once you've identified your stakeholders, it's time to gather their business requirements. These might be specific needs and requirements that come from each business unit involved, but all must be required. For that reason, it's best to break them down into categories: 1) Business and Enterprise: enterprise strategy and goals are applied to the mobile learning realm 2) Technology and Functionality: specifics about functional and technical requirements 3) Audience and External: can include demographic information, key learning objectives and job function information How do you address the business requirements with regard to mobile? The most challenging aspect of developing a mobile learning requirements analysis is addressing the business requirements that your stakeholders identify. Concerning business and enterprise requirements, here are some questions you need to be able to answer: What is the overall vision for the use of mobile learning within the company? What is the scope of the project? For instance, is it a pilot study? Will it be rolled out to specific groups or departments? Are all employees provided with mobile devices? What are the platforms you need to target and plan for? What are the requirements for how the content should look and feel, particularly with regard to navigation and presentation? What are the risks of implementing mobile learning within the company? What contingency plans can be made to cover these risks? Are certain levels of risk acceptable? Will the introduction of a mobile learning system within the company cause new problems among users? What are the steps necessary to develop the mobile learning system? Is there a schedule or project plan in place? Is a custom solution necessary, or are there commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solutions that might help build the mobile learning system? If so, how are they deployed and maintained? When will the company switch to the new mobile learning system? What procedures are necessary to make that happen? What happens to the old system? The technology and functionality requirements and constraints must also be fulfilled for the project to move ahead. Ensure that the technology is accessible to all, meets the company's security needs, and all security standards are adhered to. Safety, durability (under all circumstances) and specific IT requirements must also be met in this project. Legal requirements should also be considered--does the mobile learning system fall under the jurisdiction of any laws (privacy, civil rights, etc.)? Other important requirements to meet include: Naming conventions and definitions: These keep everyone on the same page in terms of understanding what's involved in mobile learning implementation. Functional and data: Describe how the new mobile learning system will actually work and what data are needed to make it useful. Usability: Make sure the mobile learning system is easy to learn and use. Performance: quick retrieval of information Maintainability and portability: Is the system sufficiently forward-compatible so that it can be updated? Is it documented? Once these aspects have been taken into account, it's time to consider the end users of mobile learning within the company as well as any external influences that may affect the project. This might include operational requirements--physical environment where the mobile learning system is utilized--along with cultural and political requirements within a company. Ensure all considerations are covered that might not have been, and of course that all documentation for users and administrators is completed correctly. You should recognize that as an IT professional, while the "end users" may be one of the final things you consider in this effort, they likely will be the first thing that a Learning and Development or HR team member/stakeholder will consider. Different departments have different priorities. Needless to say, the process of developing a requirements analysis for mobile learning is a difficult one. It requires more than one person internally, or possibly an outside consulting service that has experience in gathering, documenting and negotiating the final set of requirements. But planning for success and the documentation of this plan will launch your efforts to a great start and leave your competition in the rear-view mirror. Chad Udell is managing director at Float.
11-16-2011
Keys to a successful MDM project

Summary
Mobile device management is a burgeoning field, with more vendors--Google (NASDAQ: GOOG) and IBM (NYSE: IBM) most recently--peddling more tools all the time. Even so, the many different technologies are all much alike, and the real succes of an MDM project lies in your planning, processes, policies and enforcement, writes Michael A. Davis in a post at InformationWeek. Limiting IT involvement is a good place to start an MDM project, in Davis's view. A mobility council, consisting of "an odd number of people from a bunch of areas of the business, and with only one person representing IT," makes for a better managing entity. The council weighs in on policies, processes and applications, and the members inform the employees in their own areas of the organization. IT takes on the roles of translating technology terms into ones the business understands and figuring out how to minimize risks while promoting opportunity. Next you will want to determine who pays for the MDM technology, and make sure business units understand the logic behind a chargeback system if you implement one. Charging business units a per-year cost of the user licenses can reduce overall expense, as the units will be more inclined to carefully consider the need for the devices. One area where MDM vendors differ is in the registration options they offer. Some have a self-service feature, while others require IT involvement. The less time and effort it takes to register devices, the more likely the management tools will be effective. "An enrollment process that is slow, complex, or otherwise painful will cause users to push back against loading the MDM client on their devices. This step is so important that failing at it could literally make or break your mobility plans," Davis cautions. Make sure you have a documented process for repairing or replacing mobile devices. If employees are using personal devices, they should get authorization before dropping it off at a supplier for a replacement. "This is a major issue for many organizations, as most users are accustomed to just stopping by an AT&T store and replacing a phone. Without a process, your sensitive corporate data just went into a bin in the carrier's back room," he writes. Finally, make sure that your encryption policy is consistent with compliance requirements and that the MDM system's capability aligns with it.   For more:- see Michael A. Davis's post at InformationWeek Related Articles:A road map for mobility through 2020Shopping for mobile apps for businessTen-year forecast for enterprise mobility: Complicated
11-16-2011
First look: Oracle NoSQL Database

Summary
Oracle's take on the distributed key-value data store is fast, flexible, and enterprise-grade serious
11-16-2011
Analytics, Mobile Apps Are Hot, Hot, Hot

Summary
It's clear by the increasing use of analytics software that companies are struggling to get their hands around the huge amounts of data it takes to run a successful business. But developing social, mobile, cloud computing and other applications are also driving the need for new technical skills.
11-16-2011
Note To Cablecos: Own The Home Network

Summary
Home isnt just where the heart is -- Its where the future growth of the cable industry lies. At least thats what attendees at yesterdays opening general session gleaned from the comments of Pat Esser, president at Cox Communications, and Sanjay Jha, chairman and CEO of Motorola...
11-16-2011
AT&T, Verizon carry most U.S. business traffic, but competitors gain ground

Summary
A new comScore report says that 20 percent of all U.S.-based, browser-based business Internet traffic as of September 2011 came from AT&T (NYSE: T). Not far behind Ma Bell were Verizon (NYSE: VZ) with a 12 percent share and CenturyLink (NYSE: CTL), which got a boost from its acquisition of Qwest in April, as the third largest ISP with a 7 percent share. As a whole, the top five largest business ISPs drove almost 50 percent of the U.S. business Internet traffic. Source: ComScore Although the market is dominated by three top providers, Greg Mishkin, comScore vice president of telecom and wireless, is quick to point out that one of the unique attributes of the business market is that "even with smaller carriers contributing only a fraction of the traffic delivered by top carriers, the business ISP market is still more competitive than the residential ISP market." Mishkin added that while AT&T and Verizon dominate the large business market, "The small business segment is even more competitive among ISPs, highlighting the need for providers to develop strong marketing strategies to ensure they can retain and grow market share." Driven by the entrance of a number of CLECs and cable operators, the SMB market continues to be the most competitive business ISP market, with about 40 percent of traffic being driven by service providers that aren't in the top 10 carrier list. And even though AT&T dominates the SMB market, its 13 percent market share is much lower than what it commands in the medium and large business segments. Comcast (Nasdaq: CMCSA) and Verizon were the second and third largest players with a respective 8 and 7 percent market share. From a local market perspective, AT&T held the top position as of September 2011, while Verizon led three of the top 10 markets, including New York. In the SMB segment, Comcast and AT&T ranked as the top ISPs in four of the top 10 local markets, while Verizon and Cablevision (NYSE: CVC) both led in one local market. What these numbers suggest is that as many SMBs near the end of their contracts with larger providers, they are increasingly looking at alternative players like regional CLECs or cable operators to get their service. For more:- see the release Related articles:AT&T U-verse, IP business services drove Q3 2011 wireline growthVerizon's Q3 wireline story driven by consumer, business gainsCenturyLink Q3: Doubles operating revenues, increases broadband subscribers
11-15-2011

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