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Displaying 75–90 (of 2528)

Title Date
Verizon places data center management task in Terremark's hands

Summary
Now that it has almost a year under its belt as a working subsidiary of Verizon (NYSE: VZ), Terremark is going to soon overtake management of all of the telco's global data centers in addition to expanding its own data center reach. Terremark's North American data centers Initially, Terremark will begin management of two of Verizon's data centers in San Jose, with plans to make assessments of other facilities in Texas, Georgia, Hong Kong, and Tokyo. "We're looking at the data center and saying, 'Okay, it's got X amount [of equipment], and if we wanted to take it to the next level, it would cost X amount of money.' Or do we just go ahead and ... build another data center?" David Layton, a senior VP for Terremark's West Region told Network Computing. The transfer of data center management comes on the heels of Terremark's newly opened data center in Silicon Valley, a spot that is situated near major fiber routes from service providers such as AT&T (NYSE: T) and CenturyLink (NYSE: CTL).   For more:- Network Computing has this article Related articles:UPDATED: Verizon adds CloudSwitch to its ever-growing cloud portfolioVerizon is bullish about the cloud services opportunity via TerremarkVerizon's Bailey: Cloud services will be a $150B market by 2020Terremark finds newfound growth by being a part of Verizon
12-12-2011
Telecom Italia Sees Lack of Tech Savvy Hurting Cloud Growth

Summary
Telecom Italia SpAs home country risks falling behind in the $68.3 billion market for computer- cloud services that allow clients to cut costs because of Italys information technology illiteracy.
12-12-2011
Attention Trainspotters: HopStop Crunches Data for Car-Less Commuter Infographic

12-12-2011
What's Up at InfoVista?

Summary
10:20 AM SPIT player suspends its shares ahead of ... ?
12-12-2011
Why Price Certainty Works

Summary
Consumers want to know exactly what they will pay for their goods or services, rather than getting a surpriseoften a shockwhen the bill arrives. Such uncertainty and consumer complaints about it were the driving force behind the decision by CTIA, in its agreement with the Federal Communications Commission,
12-12-2011
The Role of CRM in Logistics Companies' IT Strategies, Part 2

12-12-2011
Study: Tablet Buyers Use Wi-Fi, Not Cellular Data

Summary
Tablet users overwhelmingly prefer to use Wi-Fi rather than cellular data plans.
12-12-2011
Article: TV, Mobile See Gains in Viewing Time

Summary
US adults spend more time with mobile than print magazines and newspapers combined
12-12-2011
Verizon displays growing pains after recovering from LTE outage

12-09-2011
Big GRC trends for 2012

Summary
So what's on tap for the GRC industry in the upcoming year? It's not a bad time to ask this question, though it is not easily answered. Every company and consultant will have a different answer, reflecting their own marketing needs. We can all agree that the market remains relatively vibrant, which is especially impressive given the still weak economic environment. As a discussion starter, let's take a look at a list compiled by Compliance 360: -- Increasing threats from bounty hunters -- Demonstrating compliance effectiveness is critical -- The "G" in GRC becomes much more important -- GRC is (finally) recognized as strategic to the CEO and board of directors -- The rise of analytics It's hard to argue with any of this, and the fourth item caught my attention. "As governance becomes more sophisticated, boards are increasingly recognizing the value that GRC brings to the company. Nothing destroys share price faster than brand damage resulting from ethics charges, product-quality issues, deferred prosecution agreements, Corporate Integrity Agreements and formal investigations by authorities. Many CEOs and their boards are also beginning to recognize that a robust GRC program can be used to clear regulatory hurdles for strategic acquisitions and facilitate growth into new markets and geographies."  Is this really true? Are more boards getting this? One could argue they are still stuck in self-defensive mindset. MF Global is a great example of a board that wasn't on the leading edge, but is it an exception or the rule?  For more: - here's the list with additional commentary Related articles:Five key elements in a GRC cloud program    Survey: GRC, legal units lack integration   Research identifies leading GRC companies
12-08-2011
Ting MVNO will vary bills based on month-to-month usage

Summary
Ting, a forthcoming MVNO run by Internet domain company Tucows, is trying to put an innovative spin on the mobile experience by billing customers based upon varying usage of voice minutes, text messages and data from month to month.   Click here for a closer look at Ting. The no-contract service, which is currently in a small, private "beta" test and will run on Sprint Nextel's (NYSE:S) network, aims to make the mobile billing experience simpler and more fair to customers, explained Ken Schafer, executive vice president of products at Tucows. Ting, like rival MVNO Republic Wireless, is an MVNO using Sprint's network to offer something different.   Customers will have minutes, text messages and data divided into different buckets. If customers use more than they have chosen for a certain month they will not be charged an overage fee but will instead get bumped up to the next usage tier for that month. However, the kicker is that if customers use less than they had though they would need, they will be bumped down to the next lowest usage tier and will receive a credit on their bill for the difference. Users will be able to continuously monitor their usage via an online dashboard. Currently, Schafer said there are only 100 users who have signed up for accounts in Ting's beta, though 300 have registered. The beta started in October. He said Ting will add more people to the beta each week, and expects to launch commercial service sometime in the first few months of next year.  Ting models its usage tiers after shirt sizes (small, medium large, etc.) and the service breaks down as follows: Voice minutes: Between 0 and 100 minutes per month costs $3; up to 500 minutes costs $9; up to 1,000 minutes costs $18; up to 2,000 minutes costs $35; and up to 3,000 minutes costs $52. Text messages (sent and received): Between 0 and 100 messages per month costs $3; up to 1,000 costs $5; up to 2,000 costs $8; up to 4,000 costs $11; and up to 6,000 costs $14.  Data: Between 0 and 100 MB costs $3 per month; up to 500 MB costs $13; up to 1 GB costs $24; up to 2 GB costs $42; and up to 3 GB costs $60. Schafer said that Ting will give users a 5 percent "grace" window on their usage before kicking customers up to the higher tier. However, he noted that if customers use anything below the bottom of tier they signed up for--499 minutes on a 1,000-minute plan, for example--they will drop down to the lower tier and get credit on their bills. "People's usage varies over time," he said. "It seems very fair. There are no penalties in any of it." He also said that users will pay less per minute, message and MB as their usage increases, which encourages users to add multiple lines of service. Another innovative aspect of the service is that customers can have multiple phones under one account, sharing pools of minutes, text message and data. Verizon Wireless (NYSE:VZ) expects to offer data plans for multiple devices sometime in 2012, Verizon Communications CEO Lowell McAdam said this week, and executives from AT&T Mobility (NYSE:T) and Sprint have hinted at such plans as well. Ting customers will have to pay $6 per device per month to keep the service active, no matter their usage. Ting will also levy a surcharge when customers use their phones abroad, for international calling and for directory assistance. The key catch is that Ting users must buy their devices upfront for the full, unsubsidized price. Currently, Tucows only supports devices running Google's (NASDAQ:GOOG) Android platform, and the beta has four devices available including the LG Optimus S for $155 and the $395 HTC Detail 4G, which can access Clearwire's (NASDAQ:CLWR) mobile WiMAX network. Schafer said he expects Ting to add more low-end and mid-range devices, as well as a high-end device, the Motorola Mobility (NYSE:MMI) Photon 4G for around $500. Schafer also said right now there no plans to support for additional operating systems--in part to keep things simple for Ting's customer service--but that might change in the future. Additionally, customers must activate their devices themselves and may need to port their numbers over to the service, which can be a cumbersome process and is something Ting is working to simplify. Schafer said Ting's customer service is another area where the company is trying to be unique. Ting will having no hold times for phone-based customer service, no separate department for retention and no "escalation" service bouncing customers from one representative to another, Schafer said. Additionally, Ting will offer customer service via online forums. Schafer declined to discuss how many customers Ting wants to sign up next year, but said he is excited about the service. He also noted that it will likely change over time, and that it's likely "the service will look and feel different a year from now, but that will be driven by what the customers want." "For us, we're really excited to get it into the market," he said. "We think we've got something that's really different. There are a lot of people that want a simple, usable service. How big that gets is something that's a very open question. We think it's going to work." For more:- see this Ting blog- see this CNET article Related Articles:Republic Wireless defends $19 'unlimited' service following scathing analyst reportVerizon's McAdam: Family data plans coming in 2012Republic Wireless hopes to shake up industry with $19 'unlimited' VoIP, data serviceRepublic Wireless to use Sprint for $19 unlimited VoIP and data serviceMVNO H2O Wireless adds 2 GB cap to $60 'unlimited' plan Article updated Dec. 9 to clarify Ting's usage tiers.
12-08-2011
Microsoft, HP Unveil Joint Cloud Offering

Summary
Will offer private, public cloud services for Microsoft apps
12-08-2011
Signs of the Video Armageddon

Summary
Verizon's OTT play could spark a big OTT war, but programming rights will determine if it's to wield weapons of mass disruption
12-08-2011
Don't let your consultant choose the metrics

Summary
When you hire a consultant, you eventually want to see measurable results from the investment. But letting the consultant define the metrics for improvement is "a sucker bet," warns consultant Bob Lewis. Instead, you must decide what improvement you want measured, he advises. Sharing some pointers from the inside, Lewis warns in a post at InfoWorld that consultants have all kinds of tricks up their sleeves to make their results measure up, beginning with switching metrics in mid-stream. If an original metric doesn't improve, consultants have been known to confess to having chosen it wrong in the first place. Another favorite trick is choosing a metric they know they can improve, such as process cycle time, at the expense of another important metric, such as throughput. A third trick is to select a metric that will show "improvement" even though it isn't necessarily beneficial to the business. Lewis's "First Law of Metrics" is "You get what you measure." If, for example, you measure management quality by employee turnover, employee performance evaluations will start looking really good and managers will be trying to reward everyone with raises. "In other words, some of the behavior that a given business metric drives is aimed at gaming the metric whenever that's easier than actually improving the business," he points out. "It's especially true when a company ties anyone's compensation to measurable improvement." For more:- see Bob Lewis's post at InfoWorld Related Articles:How to use metrics to talk to the businessMoneyball's metrics lessons for ITThe best metrics to prove IT's value
12-07-2011
The CIO as Supply Chain Manager

Summary
There will come a day, soon, when even large companies will have very little technology in-house to manage. CIOs can prepare by adopting a supply-chain mentality and approach to IT.
12-07-2011

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