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Lyndsay Wise

Hi and welcome to my blog! I look forward to bringing you weekly posts about what is happening in the world of BI, CDI and marketing performance management.

About the author >

Lyndsay is the President and Founder of WiseAnalytics, an independent analyst firm specializing in business intelligence, master data management and unstructured data. For†more than†seven years, she has assisted clients in business systems analysis, software selection and implementation of enterprise applications. Lyndsay conducts regular research studies, consults, writes articles and speaks about improving the value of business intelligence within organizations. She can be reached at lwise@wiseanalytics.com.

Editor's Note: More articles and resources†are available in Lyndsay's BeyeNETWORK†Expert†Channel. Be sure to visit today!

Many solutions claim to be self-service and tout the value of their offerings by saying that ease of use and high levels of interactivity exist. The reality of these solutions, however, is that there is no industry standard for self-service delivery. There are only concepts of design that are used to enable independent analytics adoption. What this means on a practical level is that the term self-service can be misleading if used without an understanding of the target audience. For instance, some self-service offerings are built with the data scientist in mind, while others are designed to enable broader analytics deployment across the organization. Although this might not seem like a big difference, both expectations and expertise differ within these groups, making their use of business analytics different.

Data analyst/scientist

Technical users expect autonomy. The ability to add data sources, create joins, and add business rules in a flexible way support the role of data scientist. The delivery of standardized dashboards or pre-defined table views only give a limited view of what analysts need to gain relevant and valuable insights. Essentially, self-service for these users is truly that – the ability to leverage data in a way that doesn’t require IT input or management to develop new business insights.¬†

In many cases, these users support management and provide analytics that aid in decision making and daily operations. Because of this, self-service capabilities need to be flexible enough to address daily challenges that may not have been accounted for in design. Since each use case cannot be defined in advance, it might not be possible to identify how information will be needed or why. After all, static reports or views will provide limited insight that will most likely require broader analytics to understand in depth. Since data scientists understand the underlying information structure and business needs, this level of self-service is understandable.  

Business user

Business users, on the other hand, require a more guided experience. This means that self-service refers to user experience. Ease of use, guided design, governed data access to ensure accurate analytics, and pre-defined views are all aspects of this level of self-service. Too much flexibility can actually lead to invalid analytics based on incorrect inferences and joins that may be based on similar field names but that aren’t connected. Therefore, part of self-service involves providing pre-defined access while still maintaining flexibility to slice and dice and one-click analytics to give users quick results.

Organization specific

Although these two audiences are the most common, other consumers also exist. Organizations may have targeted self-service audiences that require specific capabilities or levels of interactivity. These unique requirements should be considered when audiences fall outside of the general types discussed above. Having successful self-service requires solutions that provide the level of self-service the user needs. If this isn’t provided accurately, then self-service interactivity may not be successful.

This post was brought to you by¬†IBM for Midsize Business¬†and opinions are my own. To read more on this topic, visit¬†¬†IBM’s Midsize Insider.¬†Dedicated to providing businesses with expertise, solutions and tools that are specific to small and midsized companies, the Midsize Business program provides businesses with the materials and knowledge they need to become engines of a smarter planet.

 

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Posted July 14, 2014 3:41 PM
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