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Lyndsay Wise

Hi and welcome to my blog! I look forward to bringing you weekly posts about what is happening in the world of BI, CDI and marketing performance management.

About the author >

Lyndsay is the President and Founder of WiseAnalytics, an independent analyst firm specializing in business intelligence, master data management and unstructured data. For more than seven years, she has assisted clients in business systems analysis, software selection and implementation of enterprise applications. Lyndsay conducts regular research studies, consults, writes articles and speaks about improving the value of business intelligence within organizations. She can be reached at lwise@wiseanalytics.com.

Editor's Note: More articles and resources are available in Lyndsay's BeyeNETWORK Expert Channel. Be sure to visit today!

Looking at organization need

One of the most common concerns I hear from organizations is the ability to implement solutions quickly and gain value that can be sold as success to management. Many businesses evaluate how long a solution will take to implement along with the amount of time it takes to have it deployed and seen as a success by business users. For SMBs looking at BI offerings specifically, there has always been the challenge of weighing the benefits against the costs of deployment. Traditional solutions were seen to take many months to implement, and the level of value associated with implementations were not always easy to measure quantitatively. Luckily, the market has matured to the point that a variety of solutions exist which can be deployed in a timely fashion. But quick implementation times are only the beginning of defining value. Having any new software project up and running does not mean that its use is associated with or providing value to the people using the system. In order to truly be successful, organizations need both. 

Time to implement vs. time to value

Sometimes businesses confuse the terms time to implement and time to value. In most cases, IT will look at implementation as their main goal. Their responsibility being to develop and deliver solutions that are used by business users. Business users, on the other hand, want to take what is provided and make better decisions, address business problems, and maintain competitive edge – and do so right away. Both are important for BI and software project success.

Achieving both means making sure that expectations from both IT and business units can be met. It also means that organizations understand what those expectations should be. The IT development effort should be driven by business need. For instance, creating customer facing dashboards and analytics to let customers gain access to their data and plan better will be different than developing self-service data discovery dashboards to increase efficiencies in marketing spend.

SMB specifics

Small and mid-sized businesses are actually driven by time to value more than their enterprise counterparts. The reality for these businesses is that they have more to lose. Resource constraints and smaller budgets mean that SMBs have to get their project choices right and make sure that they can achieve value quickly. Otherwise they risk losing money and not being able to get back on track without major trade-offs. In many cases, I’ve seen expectations about both implementation times and achieving value not met because of IT resources working on multiple projects and not being able to plan accurately. At the same time, business users lack the understanding of the development efforts required and expect that their BI project will be looked at as the main priority. 

In order to avoid these risks, project stakeholders need to work as a team, define their goals, develop realistic expectations, and make sure that the value proposition of the solution(s) can be realized based on these aspects.

This post was written as part of the IBM for Midsize Business program, which provides midsize businesses with the tools, expertise and solutions they need to become engines of a smarter planet. I’ve been compensated to contribute to this program, but the opinions expressed in this post are my own and don’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions.

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Posted June 22, 2014 9:56 PM
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