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Dan Power

Greetings to all of my friends who work in the area of computerized decision support. This blog is a way for me to share stories from my encounters related to decision support, to comment on industry events, and to comment on other blogger's comments, especially those of my friends on the Business Intelligence Network. I'll try to state my opinions clearly and provide an old professor's perspective on how computers and information technology are changing the world. Decision making has always been my focus, and it will be in this blog as well. Your comments, feedback and questions are welcomed.

About the author >

Daniel J. "Dan" Power is a Professor of Information Systems and Management at the College of Business Administration at the University of Northern Iowa and the editor of DSSResources.com, the Web-based knowledge repository about computerized systems that support decision making; the editor of PlanningSkills.com; and the editor of DSS News, a bi-weekly e-newsletter. Dr. Power's research interests include the design and development of decision support systems and how these systems impact individual and organizational decision behavior.

Editor's Note: More articles and resources are available in Dan's BeyeNETWORK Expert Channel. Be sure to visit today!

November 2013 Archives

by Daniel Power
Editor, DSSResources.com 

Thirty years ago, at the start of my career, I addressed this question (cf., Power, 1983). My MIS Quarterly article explored 2 possible scenarios related to information management. At the time, there was widespread optimism that managing information could and would revolutionize organizations and have a profound effect on organizational decision making. The article developed two scenarios intended to help managers anticipate the effect of better managing information on organizational decision making. The scenarios described possible impacts of managing information, improved information technologies and decision support in a hypothetical multi-division conglomerate. Much has changed since 1983 and now seems an appropriate time to revisit those scenarios and this broad, general question of the impact of information management on the organization.

Continue reading at http://dssresources.com/faq/index.php?action=artikel&id=293

Please cite as:

Power, D. J. "What is the impact of information management on the organization?" Decision Support News, Vol. 14, No. 24, November 24, 2013 at URL http://dssresources.com/newsletters/358.php

Posted November 24, 2013 6:17 AM
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by Daniel Power
Editor, DSSResources.com 

A robust decision support capability is perhaps desirable. Robust means a decision support system (DSS) requires little change as circumstances change or that it can adjust to changing circumstances. So a robust decision support capability is either especially flexible (cf., Power, 2008) and easy for users or developers to adapt, alter and change or it is self-adjusting based on machine learning. In general, experience suggests "robust" is not a major DSS requirement and one can argue that automating learning by a decision support system is undesirable. The critical issue is establishing indicators that help a user or developer recognize and identify the need to change and adapt a decision support capability.

Continue reading at http://dssresources.com/faq/index.php?action=artikel&id=260

Please cite as:

Power, D. J. "How important is a robust decision support capability?" Decision Support News, Vol. 14, No. 23, November 10, 2013.

Posted November 14, 2013 6:34 AM
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