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Dan Power

Greetings to all of my friends who work in the area of computerized decision support. This blog is a way for me to share stories from my encounters related to decision support, to comment on industry events, and to comment on other blogger's comments, especially those of my friends on the Business Intelligence Network. I'll try to state my opinions clearly and provide an old professor's perspective on how computers and information technology are changing the world. Decision making has always been my focus, and it will be in this blog as well. Your comments, feedback and questions are welcomed.

About the author >

Daniel J. "Dan" Power is a Professor of Information Systems and Management at the College of Business Administration at the University of Northern Iowa and the editor of DSSResources.com, the Web-based knowledge repository about computerized systems that support decision making; the editor of PlanningSkills.com; and the editor of DSS News, a bi-weekly e-newsletter. Dr. Power's research interests include the design and development of decision support systems and how these systems impact individual and organizational decision behavior.

Editor's Note: More articles and resources are available in Dan's BeyeNETWORK Expert Channel. Be sure to visit today!

October 2013 Archives

by Daniel Power
Editor, DSSResources.com 

People often make bad or "less" than optimal decisions. Do you think it would be great if a computer was providing advice and information in real-time relevant to decisions that you needed to make? Imagine a salesperson about to meet a prospective customer who could quickly read about prior interactions with the person or a manager with an intelligent assistant that provided reminders and decision-relevant facts. These are augmented decision-making scenarios. Augmented decision-making is the promise that if a person so chooses, then a computer can be companion, advisor and more on an ongoing, context aware, networked basis. In some ways these scenarios sound scary, what if a person can't "unplug" or is told to use augmentation.

Continue reading at http://dssresources.com/faq/index.php?action=artikel&id=279

Please cite as:

Power, D. J. "What is augmented decision-making?" Decision Support News, Vol. 14, No. 22, October 27, 2013.

Posted October 29, 2013 4:02 PM
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by Daniel Power
Editor, DSSResources.com 

Data-driven and document-driven decision support systems derive functionality from data stores and databases. Beginning in the late 1990s, distributed computing facilitated deployment of new database architectures and led to post-relational databases. Storing and processing data across multiple computing nodes however creates potential problems in transaction processing. The expansion of the Internet and the need for managing larger data stores faster also led to innovation. In 2000, Eric Brewer popularized the acronym "BASE" in his keynote address at the ACM Symposium titled "Towards Robust Distributed Systems". Brewer also explained the CAP Theorum. CAP refers to Consistency, Availability and Partition Tolerance. The theorum asserts a distributed, networked system can have only two of these three properties. How are these concepts relevant to decision support?

Continue reading at http://dssresources.com/faq/index.php?action=artikel&id=281

please cite as;

Power, D. J. "What is ACID and BASE in database theory?" Decision Support News, Vol. 14, No. 21, October 13, 2013.

Posted October 17, 2013 9:40 PM
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by Daniel Power
Editor, DSSResources.com 

Big data can mean big problems for individuals and organizations. Edward Snowden's NSA leaks demonstrate some of the problems of data privacy and security. Also, many people wrongly assume there is a right to privacy in the United States. Linder (2013) notes however that "the U. S. Constitution contains no express right to privacy." He does explore some implicit protections in the U.S. Constitution, but the framers of the U.S. Constitution did not and could not anticipate the rapidly evolving technology possibilities for collecting and analyzing data about people, their beliefs and behaviors. Organizations are collecting extensive data about individuals including customers, employees, and suppliers. More behavioral and unstructured data will be collected in the future and it will be analyzed.

Continue reading at http://dssresources.com/faq/index.php?action=artikel&id=275

Please cite as:

Power, D. J. "What decision support data should be anonymous, confidential, private?" Decision Support News, Vol. 14, No. 20, September 29, 2013.

Posted October 8, 2013 7:33 PM
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