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Dan Power

Greetings to all of my friends who work in the area of computerized decision support. This blog is a way for me to share stories from my encounters related to decision support, to comment on industry events, and to comment on other blogger's comments, especially those of my friends on the Business Intelligence Network. I'll try to state my opinions clearly and provide an old professor's perspective on how computers and information technology are changing the world. Decision making has always been my focus, and it will be in this blog as well. Your comments, feedback and questions are welcomed.

About the author >

Daniel J. "Dan" Power is a Professor of Information Systems and Management at the College of Business Administration at the University of Northern Iowa and the editor of DSSResources.com, the Web-based knowledge repository about computerized systems that support decision making; the editor of PlanningSkills.com; and the editor of DSS News, a bi-weekly e-newsletter. Dr. Power's research interests include the design and development of decision support systems and how these systems impact individual and organizational decision behavior.

Editor's Note: More articles and resources are available in Dan's BeyeNETWORK Expert Channel. Be sure to visit today!

October 2010 Archives

by Dan Power
Editor, DSSResources.com   

Charles Phillips (the former Oracle copresident) is featured in the September/October 2010 Oracle Magazine in an article titled "The Next Stage in Business Intelligence." I always looked at Phillips as an acquisition specialist and not a technical or conceptual guy.  So no surprise he is providing platitudes.  Mark Hurd does know something about Business Intelligence, we'll see what he does in coming months.

So what did Phillips say in his July 7, 2010 speech in London?

"We've taken the idea of an integrated suite and applied that to business intelligence because there are a lot of ways to extract information out of systems, but you need the information to be consistent."

"We architected this system so you have common metadata across all datasources, all calculation engines, all rules, all workflow." 

If only the architecture would do this.  People introduce the problems.

Supposedly BI 11g "... solves some of the largest problems IT faces, which don't go away just by hoping everyone works together," Phillips said. "They have to be engineered that way."

So now we are engineering away people problems associated with metadata. No chance.

Posted October 19, 2010 5:44 PM
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