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Dan Power

Greetings to all of my friends who work in the area of computerized decision support. This blog is a way for me to share stories from my encounters related to decision support, to comment on industry events, and to comment on other blogger's comments, especially those of my friends on the Business Intelligence Network. I'll try to state my opinions clearly and provide an old professor's perspective on how computers and information technology are changing the world. Decision making has always been my focus, and it will be in this blog as well. Your comments, feedback and questions are welcomed.

About the author >

Daniel J. "Dan" Power is a Professor of Information Systems and Management at the College of Business Administration at the University of Northern Iowa and the editor of DSSResources.com, the Web-based knowledge repository about computerized systems that support decision making; the editor of PlanningSkills.com; and the editor of DSS News, a bi-weekly e-newsletter. Dr. Power's research interests include the design and development of decision support systems and how these systems impact individual and organizational decision behavior.

Editor's Note: More articles and resources are available in Dan's BeyeNETWORK Expert Channel. Be sure to visit today!

February 2009 Archives

Gartner, IBM Cognos and others have discussed "flawless business inteligence" and "avoiding fatal flaws". So why another discussion? Perhaps a checklist will help improve system implementation and discussion with vendors.

Question #1: What is the purpose of the proposed system? Reporting, ad hoc query and analysis, performance monitoring?

Question #2: Who wants the system? Will they really use it?

Question #3: Is there a data quality problem? How serious is the problem?

Question #4: What vendors are "best in class"? Are you wedded to your current vendor of transaction systems?

Question #5: Do you have a realistic schedule for the evaluation and implementation process?

Question #6: Do you have in-house staff to work on the project? If not, are you comfortable outsourcing to contractors or vendor staff a key decision support capability?

Question #7: Did the person suggesting the project just meet with a vendor or attend a tradeshow? Are they excited about dashboards?

Please ask these questions and review the answers carefully as part of a feasibility study. If the decision is to proceed with a project, invite vendors to respond to a structured request.


Posted February 19, 2009 11:58 AM
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