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John Myers

Hey all-

Welcome to my blog. The fine folks at the BeyeNETWORK™ have provided me with this forum to offer opinion and insight into the worlds of telcommunications (telecom) and business activity monitoring (BAM). But as with any blog, I am sure that we (yes we... since blogging is a "team sport"...) will explore other tangents that intersect the concepts of telecom and BAM.

In this world of "Crossfire" intellectual engagement (i.e. I yell louder therefore I win the argument), I will try to offer my opinion in a constructive manner. If I truly dislike a concept, I will do my best to offer an alternative as opposed to simply attempting to prove my point by disproving someone else's. I ask that people who post to this blog follow in my lead.

Let the games begin....

About the author >

John Myers, a senior analyst in the business intelligence (BI) practice at  Enterprise Management Associates (EMA). In this role, John delivers comprehensive coverage of the business intelligence and data warehouse industry with a focus on database management, data integration, data visualization, and process management solutions. Prior to joining EMA, John spent over ten years working with business analytics implementations associated with the telecommunications industry.

John may be contacted by email at JMyers@enterprisemanagement.com.

Editor's note: More telecom articles, resources, news and events are available in the BeyeNETWORK's Telecom Channel. Be sure to visit today!

Recently in Product Management / Development Category

One of the great aspects of 1980’s television was the show Moonlighting with Cybill Shepherd and Bruce Willis ( …with hair… lots of it actually… ).  The scripts were usually about 2x the size of a ‘normal’ one hour tv show and the back and forth between Shepherd and Willis was amazing and funny. These exchanges were usually highlighted by very honest observations about the world around them.  Recently, I saw two pieces about wireless phones that made me think of “Maddie” poking holes in “David”’s arguments.

The first was a piece about an assessment of the smart-phone marketplace.  Gartner seems to think that Nokia’s lack of appealing smart-phones.

The second was a study about features that people want to see in smart-phones.  Instat provided the following feedback on improvements to smart-phones:

  • better connectivity
  • better audio
  • better usability

Hmmmm… It wasn’t the overall economy or the expense of required data plans relative to disposable income that negatively impacted the smart-phone market?  And, the features that people want most in phones can be reduced to being able to make better phone calls?

I will entrust the analysis of those situations to the ‘readers’….  But I will leave you with my all-time favorite Moonlight scenes just before the New Year… Enjoy the blast from the 80’s!

Security Officer: I'm sorry, but you're not on the guest list.
David Addison: That's because we're not guests. We're looking for a man with a mole on his nose.
Security Officer: A mole on his nose?
Maddie Hayes: A mole on his nose.
Security Officer: [to Maddie] What kind of clothes?
Maddie Hayes: [to David] What kind of clothes?
David Addison: What kind of clothes do you suppose?
Security Officer: What kind of clothes do I suppose would be worn by a man with a mole on his nose? Who knows?
David Addison: Did I happen to mention, did I bother to disclose, that this man that we're seeking with the mole on his nose? I'm not sure of his clothes or anything else, except he's Chinese, a big clue by itself.
Maddie Hayes: How do you do that?
David Addison: Gotta read a lot of Dr. Seuss.
Security Officer: I'm sorry to say, I'm sad to report, I haven't seen anyone at all of that sort. Not a man who's Chinese with a mole on his nose with some kind of clothes that you can't suppose. So get away from this door and get out of this place, or I'll have to hurt you - put my foot in your face.

 

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Posted December 30, 2009 2:22 PM
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Recently IDC provided some encouraging predictions on increased levels of IT spending for 2010:

“consumers and businesses worldwide will spend 3.2% more on telecommunications, hardware, software and services than in 2009, returning the industry to 2008 revenue levels of about $1.5 trillion

However, this doesn’t mean that telecoms aren’t taking looking at the revenues and the costs associated with their product platform portfolios.  Many telecoms are balancing their investments where they see the most benefits.

From a revenue perspective, we have seen this in the form of divestiture from rural markets by organizations like Verizon divesting US-based rural landline markets and AT&T divesting from international services organizations in favor of more attractive ( …or at least attractive based on the returns and projected future value vs an internal rate of return… ) opportunities.  From a costs perspective, Verizon is continuing to streamline their landline operations and make additional investments in 4G wireless broadband.

In my opinion, this portfolio management is sometimes short-sighted from a long-term perspective ( …it is also sometimes mandated by the department of justice… ).  However, it also displays the increasing differences between the operational and business intelligence requirements associated with innovative and mature products.

4G wireless operations and business measurement will be more like the early days of wireless where “gross adds” and “revenues” were most important.  This is contrasted by landline voice services which are driven by “churn containment” and “expense management”.

How do you view the differences between these types of telecom products from a business measurement / analytics perspective?

Post your comments below or email (John.Myers@BlueBuffaloGroup.com) / twitter (JohnLMyers44) me directly.


Posted December 23, 2009 1:19 PM
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One of my favorite parts of my iPhone is the screen.  While I wasn’t upset with the quality of the screen on my old Nokia E62, the iPhone screen is much better by comparison.

It looks like we will soon see even bigger screens for mobile devices.  But it begs the question:

Wouldn’t you be better off with a “smaller” laptop with the ability to send voice calls (ie skype or other) than you would with a mobile device that you have to fold out a screen and/or keyboard?

Occam’s Razor says that you should strive for the simple over the complicated.  Perhaps a folding screen is one example of getting too cleaver by half… :)


Posted December 2, 2008 8:00 AM
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Every year I love to see the photos from the Detroit Auto Show. In particular, the concept cars are some of my favorites. From those initial Viper designs that reached the street about as fast as car can get from the show to production to the Corvette designs that only seem to "upset" the 60-70 year old 'Vette owners and never see the light of day; the designs are always something to see.

Well now I think I have seen the rough equivalent of those concept cars... A concept phone. Presented at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) by Nokia, this combination of art and nanotechnology is quite impressive. Here's a link to MOMA presentation. Enjoy!

NOTE - Nope, I'm not totally a Nokia shill... If Motorola had something half as interesting, I would post the information about it as well.... :) Up that R&D budget guys...

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Posted March 5, 2008 8:00 AM
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The answer is to be a value-add product/service. Something that people can't live without. Commodities are things that can be "swapped out" at Wal-Mart. Value-add products are things that are the last to go when budgets are scaled down.

Kimberly Johnson looks at how DirecTV appears to have positioned themselves as a value-add product as opposed to generic cable operators and EchoStar.

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Posted November 26, 2007 8:00 AM
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