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John Myers

Hey all-

Welcome to my blog. The fine folks at the BeyeNETWORK™ have provided me with this forum to offer opinion and insight into the worlds of telcommunications (telecom) and business activity monitoring (BAM). But as with any blog, I am sure that we (yes we... since blogging is a "team sport"...) will explore other tangents that intersect the concepts of telecom and BAM.

In this world of "Crossfire" intellectual engagement (i.e. I yell louder therefore I win the argument), I will try to offer my opinion in a constructive manner. If I truly dislike a concept, I will do my best to offer an alternative as opposed to simply attempting to prove my point by disproving someone else's. I ask that people who post to this blog follow in my lead.

Let the games begin....

About the author >

John Myers, a senior analyst in the business intelligence (BI) practice at Enterprise Management Associates (EMA). In this role, John delivers comprehensive coverage of the business intelligence and data warehouse industry with a focus on database management, data integration, data visualization, and process management solutions. Prior to joining EMA, John spent over ten years working with business analytics implementations associated with the telecommunications industry.

John may be contacted by email at JMyers@enterprisemanagement.com.

Editor's note: More telecom articles, resources, news and events are available in the BeyeNETWORK's Telecom Channel. Be sure to visit today!

October 2007 Archives

The TDWI Conference in Orlando this week features a slightly different theme. Rather than strictly technical data quality the topic was overall leadership in the area of data governance. This difference in theme brought out “new blood” in terms of attendees and vendor/sponsors.

Many of these attendees and vendors are focusing their energy on the business, or contextual, aspects of data governance rather than just the technical, or syntax related aspects that have been traditionally a part of data quality. This manifests itself in areas like master data management (MDM) for customer relationship management as a part of integrated marketing efforts; revenue assurance as part of revenue management; or route optimization as part of an operations research segment of cost management.

This focus, on assessing the business value of an organization’s data in addition to its technical consistency, is showing the maturity of data professionals and their place in the organization. This is similar to my "Needles in the Haystack" posting earlier this month.

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Posted October 31, 2007 9:54 PM
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For regular readers, you know that that I’m not a huge fan of the “walled garden” concept for online, mobile and just about any content. However, I do understand and appreciate those business models and the right of those companies to leverage their intellectual property for short-term financial gain and long-term irrelevance ( ...will the last AOL employee please turn off the lights in Virginia… )

It appears that the more and more established mainstream media outlets are staring to understand the value of opening their content and breaking down the barriers to consumers partaking of their content. The New York Times, Financial Times and Wall Street Journal all have plans to make their content less restricted.

I personally applaud these efforts and hope that they do a great job of making them available to me via a mobile browser so that I can read the content online via my phone the next time that I’m stuck at the Dallas airport waiting for an unnamed airline ( ...their initials are aa... ) to decide if they are going to fly on time or just continue faking the flight schedule….

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Posted October 29, 2007 8:00 AM
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For those in revenue assurance organizations, Vince Shaw and Michael Ravin published last year an interesting article that raises some great points about looking at revenue leakage in the telecom industry. The points that I enjoyed were the following:

  • There is no such thing as an average for revenue loss. Yes, you can calculate an average. But just as no US family has the nation wide “average” of 2.3 kids (or at least not for very long), trying to find an average revenue loss for an organization is almost impossible to do.
  • Revenue loss isn’t something that “pops” up at you and says “Hi… Here I am”. It takes two components. The right data and the imagination to answer the question the following question:
“Where can we find what we don’t know that we don’t know.”

For robust business intelligence or revenue assurance organizations, this won’t be an earth shattering read, but it will give validation and potentially some new areas of “unknown unknowns”. For less robust organizations, this can be a very helpful “primer” on where to start looking for “unknown unknowns”.

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Posted October 26, 2007 8:00 AM
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What’s the next “mythical” creature after the long rumored and now VERY present iPhone?

It appears that the Google “gPhone” will soon be upon us. It also looks like the gPhone will take a much different approach than the iPhone’s AT&T “walled garden” approach with hardware and network. According to some rumors, the gPhone will not be a single hardware platform ( ...but may very well take that form to start... ), but rather a software/operating system approach that will be an open linux based solution that can run on many different handsets and many different networks.

Hmmm… This sounds a lot like different approaches of IBM and Microsoft in the early days of PCs. However, I’m guessing that Steve Jobs is smarter than the guy at IBM who said:

“Go ahead and have the operating system Bill…. The hardware is where it’s at….”

NOTE - I think that IBM executive is remembered in the same breathe with Alan Ladd - the guy who told George Lucas that 20th Century Fox didn’t need or want the merchandising rights to Star Wars…

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Posted October 24, 2007 8:00 AM
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Within network data that most telecom organizations have collected, there lies a wealth of information that could be used by many different departments. Jim Barthold has a good article that The issue is that majority of this is viewed as simply collected network data. But there are needles in the haystack of collected xDRs.

Just as there is information about network issues or usage, there is specific information about customer adoption rates on products and services. Among the information about switch and trunk data is information about how products are performing. It is the ability to use this data that will separate robust organizations from other telecommunication providers.

In fact, this situation shows one of the barriers to the use of business intelligence that most organizations, telecom or otherwise, have. Many organizations have the data, but they have issues understanding exactly what the data is or can tell them. According to an article from Allen Alter, often times, it takes 2-5 years for organizations to truly start to utilize their data.

While I think that is a little longer than most organizations have patience for, it does show that BI isn’t as quick as some would like. Also, it shows that there is a “trick” to the gleaning of information from data. Most organizations will need to time to either develop in-house talent or contract with outside organizations to truly gain value from their data.

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Posted October 22, 2007 8:00 AM
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