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Mark Madsen

Open source is becoming a required option for consideration in many enterprise software evaluations, and business intelligence (BI) isn't exempt. This blog is the interactive part of my Open Source expert channel for the Business Intelligence Network where you can suggest and discuss news and events. The focus is on open source as it relates to analytics, business intelligence, data integration and data warehousing. If you would like to suggest an article or link, send an e-mail to me at open_source_links@ThirdNature.net.

About the author >

Mark, President of Third Nature, is a former CTO and CIO with experience working in both IT and vendors, including a stint at a company used as a Harvard Business School case study. Over the past decade, Mark has received awards for his work in data warehousing, business intelligence and data integration from the American Productivity & Quality Center, the Smithsonian Institute and TDWI. He is co-author of Clickstream Data Warehousing and lectures and writes about data integration, business intelligence and emerging technology.


December 2007 Archives

The Independent Oracle Users Group (IOUG) sponsored a study on open source database use in Oracle shops in September. I referenced some of their information in my open source BI/DW courses to show what I believe to be some of the issues preventing open source database adoption for data warehousing.

The study showed that most (81%) OSS databases were less than 50GB in size, but there were a handful in the 1-2T B size. Only 12% of respondents use OSS databases for data warehousing.

One of the things I've often wondered is whether the "express" databases from Oracle and IBM are effective at containing OSS databases. According to the survey (page 12) the answer is "no" . If you think about using an "express" database with a production application, you have both technical and cost considerations should you choose to do a broader deployment. If you start with open source you don't face the same limitations, so I would expect OSS to continue to erode share at the lower end as well as capturing more new application development done inside IT.

Check out the study for yourself. It isn't specific to data warehousing and has some interesting information about other areas like adoption trends, application and application server use.


Posted December 6, 2007 5:46 PM
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