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Bin Jiang, Ph.D.

Greetings and welcome to my BeyeNETWORK blog, logging my latest thinking about data warehousing and more! As an engineer with a little philosophical flavor and considering this as an earnest engineering affair, I will review essential aspects around data warehousing with you, a work I started by writing my book published last year. This can be highly philosophical or deeply technical; this can also be industry specific or technology generic. I will occasionally ask provocative questions to get you thinking and induce inspiring discussions. This way, I hope, we will be able to share valuable thoughts. I would like to thank Frank Buytendijk for recommending me to join this honorable platform.

About the author >

Dr. Bin Jiang received his master’s degree in Computer Science from the University of Dortmund / Germany in 1986. In 1992, he received his doctorate in Computer Science from ETH Zurich / Switzerland. During the research period, two of his publications in the field of database management systems were awarded as the best student papers at the IEEE Conference on Data Engineering in 1990 and 1992.

Afterward, he worked for several major Swiss banks, insurance companies, retailers, and with one of the largest international data warehousing consulting firms as a system engineer, software developer, and application analyst in the early years, and then as a senior data warehouse consultant and architect for almost twenty years.

Dr. Bin Jiang is a Distinguished Professor of a large university in China, and the author of the book Constructing Data Warehouses with Metadata-driven Generic Operators (DBJ Publishing, July 2011), which Dr. Claudia Imhoff called “a significant feat” and for which Bill Inmon provided a remarkable foreword. Dr. Jiang can be reached by email at bin.jiang@bluewin.ch

Editor's Note: You can find more articles from Dr. Bin Jiang and a link to his blog in his BeyeNETWORK expert channel, Data Warehouse Realization.

"Every meta-effort is for effectiveness improvement," I think. I think that this think is big enough.

If I ask Frank Buytendijk how I should start small with this big one, he would surely say: "Have a guess how the great philosophers would do." He wrote a little story about Confucius at the beginning of his article "The Myth of the One Version of the Truth":

"When Confucius was asked what he would do first if he were in power, he responded: 'Cleanse the definitions of terms we use!'
 According to Confucius, nothing is so destructive for peace, justice and prosperity as confusing names and definitions.
"

I am not in power. But I am starting to blog at a powerful platform, the BeyeNETWORK.com! Thus, I should "cleanse the definitions of terms we use" with you as my start, hopefully small enough. Later, I will consider the problem of "Single Version of the Interpretation," a bigger one, not only from the governance perspective, but also from an engineering point of view. As mentioned at the beginning, everything here is about effectiveness improvement, the biggest one in my opinion.

As the first step, I would like to invite you to have a look at the definition of data warehouses in an article series on the BeyeNETWORK. In the first article of the series, "Is Yours Really a Data Warehouse?", I review the definitional situation in the field. Then in the second one, "Is Inmon's Data Warehouse Definition Still Accurate?", I have a close look at Inmon's definition. In the third one, "1001 Data Warehouse Definitions: Is This One Accurate?", a revised definition is proposed with detailed explanations. In the fourth one, "Defining Data Warehouse Variants by Classification," I suggest a classification of data warehouses. The closing one of the series, "Refining the Enterprise Data Warehouse Definition by Requirements Categorization," refines the data warehouse definition just proposed by categorizing requirements. At the end of this article, a pure philosophical question regarding data warehouses is asked as well for you to consider.


Posted July 12, 2012 7:07 AM
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