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Richard Hackathorn

Welcome to my blog stream. I am focusing on the business value of low latency data, real-time business intelligence (BI), data warehouse (DW) appliances, use of virtual world technology, ethics of business intelligence and globalization of business intelligence. However, my blog entries may range widely depending on current industry events and personal life changes. So, readers beware!

Please comment on my blogs and share your opinions with the BI/DW community.

About the author >

Dr. Richard Hackathorn is founder and president of Bolder Technology, Inc. He has more than thirty years of experience in the information technology industry as a well-known industry analyst, technology innovator and international educator. He has pioneered many innovations in database management, decision support, client-server computing, database connectivity, associative link analysis, data warehousing, and web farming. Focus areas are: business value of timely data, real-time business intelligence (BI), data warehouse appliances, ethics of business intelligence and globalization of BI.

Richard has published numerous articles in trade and academic publications, presented regularly at leading industry conferences and conducted professional seminars in eighteen countries. He writes regularly for the BeyeNETWORK.com and has a channel for his blog, articles and research studies. He is a member of the IBM Gold Consultants since its inception, the Boulder BI Brain Trust and the Independent Analyst Platform.

Dr. Hackathorn has written three professional texts, entitled Enterprise Database Connectivity, Using the Data Warehouse (with William H. Inmon), and Web Farming for the Data Warehouse.

Editor's Note: More articles and resources are available in Richard's BeyeNETWORK Expert Channel. Be sure to visit today!

tdp logo.pngI hate concurrent sessions! It seems like all the sessions that I really wanted to attend are all scheduled for this time slot. So, this blog is composed of pieces from several...as I skip around rooms.

Dirk Anderson, Architect for the Bank of America, talked on In-Database SAS processing for their anti-money-laundering team. First, various limitations of doing traditional analytics of moving data from DW to SAS, processing in SAS, and moving data back to the DW.

Neil McGowan, CIO for J D Williams, and Chris Brierley, DW Manager, both of J D Williams talked on multi-channel targeted marketing. They experimented with Speed-Trap to capture key/mouse movements when browsing product pages.

Todd Papaioannou, Purveyor of Damn Cool Technologies (no kidding!) at Teradata, talked on how Teradata is using cloud computing. Todd described an elastic mart that uses the Teradata data warehouse. It is self-service by users to create their own private data marts within a managed environment. Todd then showed a 5-minute video of launching a Teradata system in the Amazon Elastic Cloud Environment. The video can be download at the Teradata Developer Exchange.

What are the business benefits? Dynamically provisioning of testing environment under multiple operating systems, porting application, backup of data, expanded market, faster POCs to reduce sales cycle, periodic DW for nightly batch load with report generation, cheaper testing systems, and so on. Impressive list!

What are the drawbacks? Performance cannot be guaranteed, security of trusting your data with someone else, service levels are tough to get, nervous about stability, security, and so on. Todd asserted that all corporations will build a private cloud eventually. Cloud computing is here to stay with some blend of private and public clouds. Virtualization is the mega trend of the next decade. Data is moving into the cloud. 

Posted October 19, 2009 9:03 PM
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